Rosalind Lemoh


when you fall softly

2018

HD Video, 1:17

With thanks to Damien Geary and Matthew Nightingale for assistance with production

Thank to CSIRO for access to the collection

Damien Geary (photographer)

BIO

Rosalind Lemoh creates sculptural objects, assemblage, light and text-based works that range from miniature to full-body scaled. Replicating parts of the body, fruits, vegetables and found objects using highly detailed silicone rubber moulds, Lemoh skilfully casts new forms in concrete, bronze and aluminium. Life-like casts such as concrete marrow bones and dead magpies conjure sombre meditations, that are drawn from a preoccupation with the still-life genre. In tandem with text-based works, they illuminate a stream-of-consciousness-style narrative. Rosalind is the recipient of numerous grants, was shortlisted for the Woollhara Small Sculpture (2008) and Blake Prize (2008 & 2018) and was selected to exhibit at ArtRooms London and the Tokyo International Art Fair in 2016 which showcases international talent from around the world.

www.rosalindlemoh.com.au

ARTIST'S STATEMENT

‘when you fall softly' explores ideas of death and departure through the still life genre. The work is an extension of my practice and explores the idea of creating memorials for passing moments, especially the interactions and relationships between humans and animals in shared urban areas such as city parks and green spaces. Based on a response to the fishing activities and wildlife of Lake Burley Griffin, this work features a taxidermy Australian black swan (Cygnus Atratus) as a focal point, set amongst a still-life spread with red grapes and flushed pomegranates. These iconic birds are part of the lake sites in and around the Canberra region and are seen throughout the year. This work was inspired by watching a large black swan struggle to swim free after it was caught by a fishing hook being reeled by a local fisherman at the lake’s edge. The work combines classical references in a contemporary format to create a moving meditation about mortality, preservation, and the vulnerable beauty and violence of living.

Using Format